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Little Red Riding Hood and Long Term Wolves

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Most people have heard of the Little Red Riding Hood. A version was written by Charles Perrault, and there have been many different tellings with many different adaptations such as Little Red Hat. The stranger in this case is a wolf which is an analogy for someone who is deceiving and trying to take advantage of you. In the Little Red Hat it is an ogre who is trying to do the same to an innocent sweet little girl. No matter what version someone has heard, the moral is the same; do not trust strangers. This moral is found in many stories even in many versions of Dracula. The moral applies to every day life. People should not stop and talk to someone on the street they don't know or even someone at a bar trying to buy them a drink. Some of these interactions can be safe, but they can also turn out to be very dangerous.

My way of looking at this story and moral is a little different. I do agree that not trusting strangers day to day is important, but I also believe that people should be very cautious with people they get to know well. I am speaking specifically about personal and business relationships. People begin as strangers every time they meet. Then once they get to know each other more and more they let their guard down. But in a personal relationship and especially the business world, many people will not think twice about stepping on someone they know just to benefit themselves. These bonds can grow for many years before the "wolf" decides to "eat" the innocent one. It has happened in the business world countless times and just as much when a couple gets together. The wolf can be disguised as a sweet old lady but when it gets hungry, it will show its true colors. The moral of not trusting strangers is great. Although, my moral is that not matter how long the walk through the woods is, or how long you've known someone, always be cautious of everyone around you.

Sources

·       Perrault, Charles. "Little Red Riding Hood." Folk and Fairy Tales. Eds. Martin Hallett and Barbara Karasek. 3rd Edition. Toronto: Broadview Press,

·       Schneller, Christian. "Little Red Hat." Trans. D. L. Ashliman. N.p., 2005. Web.17 Apr. 2017.

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