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The stories “Little Red Hat” and “Little Red Riding Hood,” highlight a more sinister theme than what is seen on the surface. Both of these stories have a deeper meaning than what is being read by the reader, and have morals that still play a large role in today’s society. This theme that both of these stories convey is that of a “be careful who you talk to” theme, and goes perfectly in to what parents teach their kids about “stranger danger.” In the story “Little Red Hat,” the ogre takes over the role of the girl’s grandmother, and tricks her into thinking that it is actually her. The ogre had killed the grandmother in order to lure the girl into the house and eventually tricked the girl into taking off her clothes and getting into bed with him. (Sneller, 2007). This same situation is presented in the “Little Red Riding Hood” story by Charles Perrault, however it is with a wolf and not an ogre. Once again the antagonist, now a wolf, kills the grandmother and pretends to be her in order to get the innocent young girl to come inside. The wolf continues to impersonate the grandmother until he has her complete trust, and this is when the girl takes off her clothes and gets into bed with the wolf, ultimately leading to her being eaten (Perrault, n.d.). Both of these tales are very graphic, that use stories to convey the very real dangers in every day life. At the end of Charles Perrault’s “Little Red Riding Hood,” he even outlines that the moral of the story is that cute, young children must be careful of who they interact with because it is usually the ones that are nice and charming that end up hurting you the worst (Perrault, n.d.). As one can see, the meaning of these stories goes beyond being eaten by beasts, and uses these beasts as metaphors for people in the real world.

References:

Perrault, Charles. LittleRed Riding Hood. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 April 2017. Retrieved from http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0333.html#perrault

Sneller, Christian. “Das Rothhutchen,” MArchen und Sagen aus Walschtirol: Ein Beitrag zur deutschen Sagenkunde. (Innsbruck: Verlag der Wagner’schen Universitats-Buchhandlung, 1867), no. 6, pp 9-10. Translated by D. L. Ashliman. 2007.

Outside sources:

1)  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Riding_Hood

2)  http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/LittRed.shtml

3)  http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/ridinghood/other.html

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